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Be on the lookout for stolen guns

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by CelticArmory, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. kell490

    kell490 Member

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    It's problem that I see with a lot of my friends who start out with a few guns then over time end up with $25-50k in firearms they are keeping it in a $700-$1500 safe. Even a liberty safe that cost you $2500 isn't good enough either buy insurance on your firearms or spend the required $8000-9000 on a TL30 safe which is what you really need to keep them out. Most safes with the right 4 wheel dolly can be taken in less then 10 minutes using a rental truck and a lift gate. Also when you drill holes into 3 1/2" concrete foundation use epoxy with the anchors I find the lead type anchors will just slide ride back out of with little prying if you don't old concrete homes will crack while drilling easy very brittle.
     
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  2. 45Frank

    45Frank Member

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    Nov 3, 2005
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    Location:
    North Carolina
    Is there a known database where one who buys guns can go and search to see if guns are stolen. I would hate to be caught with a gun that is stolen.
    I came across this website (http://www.hotgunz.com/) does anyone know if it's legitimate?
     
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  3. JTHunter

    JTHunter Member

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    In the past month, there has been 6-7 break-ins in the St. Louis, MO, area, one of which people working in an adjacent store had 4 rounds fired at them as they called the police, breaking the front window but hurting no one.
    The stores hit were in Des Peres (11/8), Affton & Valley Park (11/10), and High Ridge (Jefferson County), Crestwood, MO, on 11/27, all suburbs of St. Louis, Edwardsville, IL (Madison County) on 11/30. The three on the 8th & 10th appear to be related as videos show the same Acura SUV at all three. ATF indicates the High Ridge and Crestwood attacks may be related but have yet to tie them to the others.
    http://kplr11.com/2017/11/30/atf-links-several-st-louis-area-gun-store-break-ins/
     
  4. oldcoot

    oldcoot Member

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    I had a young man that was in the army come by a 12 years ago to visit and after he left I discovered my model S&W 19 was missing, I called him and asked about it he denied it so I called the police and told them the serial # and the name of the so and so that stole it. still aint got it back.
     
  5. CRP82

    CRP82 Member

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    Jan 11, 2018
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    After browsing through this thread, it sucks to see people have had their stuff stolen, sorry to hear about this. I thought I would share a few thoughts.

    Seeing the notes of people with gun shop break ins, I thought I would share this note. I had an interesting conversation with a local shop who was burglarized as a smash and grab about a year or so ago. A few shops in the Denver area had the similar break ins, around the same time. Someone drove a car through the front, loaded up what they could, and left. On to the conversation. I had stopped in to get a scope mounted, and while I was waiting, I asked the guy if they ever found anything out, and he said not yet. He did say that law enforcement suspects drug cartel initiations for local gangs was the motive. He said they do this to initiate new members into their supporting gangs, and a lot of time guns don't actually get to Mexico. They likely get to other places in the US where firearms are harder to get, and go for a premium on the streets, such as California, Chicago, etc. They stay in the hands of gangs related to the cartels, and operate in the US. Just something to throw out there for thought on the shop robberies.

    Now for home measures: This is my $.02, and some has been covered, but here is my input and measures I take to protect what I have. I like to read what others do as well, as sometimes there is good input and things I didn't think about.

    First, don't share your inventory with guests, or location thereof. A friend (who may not really be a friend) or a friend of a friend may hear about the loot in your house, and knows where to go get it. If someone knows you have guns and asks to see them, invite them to a range trip and tell them you will bring a couple they can shoot. I have a lot of friends that are interested in looking, but not really in shooting. This helps redirect the conversation for the looky-loos and people whom are truly interested in shooting sports take you up on the offer.

    Second, and very important, follow your safe manufacturers instructions for securing the safe. If there are 4 (or 6, etc.) holes to mount it, use them all with heavy duty hardware, and there is no such thing as overkill here. The safe I bought, I talked to the dealer and he showed me videos on youtube of how quickly even the strongest safe can be broken into if they are pushed over on their side or back. (Search for breaking into safes on youtube and you will see what I mean, it was actually pretty surprising to me.) It takes literally a few minutes to pry doors off a heavy duty safe if they can lay a safe down. The steel cabinets are much easier. The guy at the shop told me this is what they will do if someone delivers a safe damaged in a fire and the owner wants to get inside if the locks were damaged by the fire and wont function properly. If it is upright, it is very hard to get leverage with pry bars and tools to pop the doors and hinges off. Also don't mount it in an easily visible or accessible location (this also limits tools that can be used and leverage). If SHTF, you can get to it easily and know how to access, but you don't want unwanted people getting to it easily or seeing it immediately. Think of this, if someone breaks in, they have access to ALL of your tools, power tools, dolly, etc, so they can use whatever is stowed in your garage as an instrument to break into the safe and/or haul it outside. With the weight of a safe, plus the contents are in a hard to get place, think of getting it out in a whole unit unopened (Assuming they couldn't get the door broken off or pick the locks). It took 5 guys + a heavy duty dolly to get mine down the stairs, empty. If someone breaks the floor anchors, get is up the stairs, and out the door, I guess they worked for it. It won't be a task 1 or 2 people can accomplish, and I am confident of that.

    Third, home security system. To me, having this is very good piece of mind, but again not foolproof. If someone breaks in and the sirens blare and the monitoring service is notified, people won't stick around. Sure it is a deterrent, but most thieves look for low hanging fruit and will be inclined to get in and out much faster without much searching in these cases. If they go in and all is silent, they will take their time.

    Finally, for worst case scenario, insurance. Hopefully we don't end up in this situation. If at least things are insured, you get them replaced. You lose the sentimental value of your first deer rifle, grandpa's shotguns, etc., but at the end of the day your financial investment has some protection for the monetary value. I have State Farm, and there is a rider on my homeowner's policy that will even cover damaged, lost, or stolen firearms if they are not in the house.

    Sorry for the long post, I know I probably missed a few other safeguards here, but wanted to share some info.
     
  6. ourway77

    ourway77 Member

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    Location:
    ocean View DE
    I have two safes I had them in my apartment while our house was being built After completion it took three of us to move them into my new house and that was with the doors removed and empty I have them in my garage they are not bolted down But with all the rifles and hand guns and all the loaded ammo they will play H#@! getting them out. If I am home they won't even get that close when I am away for a month in February I have 2 nosey neighbors who see every thing. When I leave to go to Florida I lock both the dead bolts on my garage door turn the power off and dead bolt the door into the house it's a key dead bolt I live on a dead end street with no alley. So I feel confident that they are safe I have several home owners that know I am away and if they saw anything suspicious they will call the police most of whom I know and they will make a special effort to respond.
     
  7. Alaskan Ironworker

    Alaskan Ironworker Member

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    Location:
    Wasilla
    Did this out of boredom, and so i can still have quick access. It only took about 20 minutes. I used a small “super magnet” screwed with a washer to the wall to keep the mirror closed, it takes about 2 pounds of force to open.
    Best part is, my wife has done her make-up in front of that mirror for almost 2 years, and she has no idea its there
     

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  8. david58

    david58 Member

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    Feb 14, 2010
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    Location:
    High Country New Mexico
    Worked with a guy in Oregon, had a very large safe bolted to the floor in his garage. Full of good stuff. Thieves wanted. Got a truck and a forklift, forced the garage door open with the forklift and then lifted the entire safe, stripping the bolts out of the floor. Not to say that bolting is futile, but if they bgs are going to use a forklift you should at least make it tougher for them.
     
  9. Alaskan Ironworker

    Alaskan Ironworker Member

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    Location:
    Wasilla
    I have a small safe in my garage unbolted. The only thing inside is a couple of dried up dog turds and a note that says better luck next time.I keep my guns elsewhere. I can only imagine a theif breaking in and finding turds. Also, a tip for anyone using epoxy or wedge anchors to secure a safe to a concrete floor; I have extensive experience using both types, and they will work much, much better if you wire brush the drilled hole and blow it out with an air compressor or a hand pump first. Also, if you have “in floor heat”, locate the tubing with an infrared temp gun.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
  10. Cayce Charles

    Cayce Charles member

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    Feb 22, 2018
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    I REALLLLLLLLY wish there was a place we could call the numbers in. Wouldn't mind being charged $1-$2. Rather that than get stuck, and loose, something I bought at a gun show to private sale
     
  11. Bobby Don

    Bobby Don Member

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    Jan 8, 2018
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    Location:
    USA
    WOW. That really sucks.
     
  12. nigelmore

    nigelmore Member

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    Aug 1, 2018
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    We really have to be careful in securing the locks of our doors. Nowadays, there are many thieves out there who are planning their attacks. An alarm device could be very useful. These stolen guns should be reported to the authority. Good thing they were not harmed by the thieves.
     
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