Quantcast

Snow Camo...

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by LRDGCO, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. LRDGCO

    LRDGCO Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2018
    Messages:
    349
    ...is ridiculous. Really. Unless you are an Eskimo; then it's legit, though 10:1 we'd be hard pressed to find an Eskimo that owned a snow camo rifle (or would admit to it). Maybe if you're in the 10th Mountain Division or the Norwegian Marines, but otherwise? Ridiculous.

    So I have a line in a rifle that I would quite like, T/C Venture in .243, for a dedicated coyote rifle. It's NIB and going well under market value. Because, snow camo. It's the whole thing, stock and barrel. Looks like the rifle the Nutcracker would carry, if he were infantry rather than cavalry. Or if the Whos down in Whoville had a militia? That's right. And the Grinch would have been buggered.

    But to the point, I am assuming it's a wrap, hydrographics. So my learned collegaues, how does one remove the Snowmeister livery? Can it be done without a great deal of hassle? If it's a hassle, can the hydrographics be scuffed up and painted over, thereby rendering this double bagger immune to theft and future resale?

    Help. It has snow camo. And I'm just not that Inuit.
     
  2. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    1,929
    maybe a hair drier and a plastic scraper to remove it.
     
  3. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    2,195
    Maybe a mild solvent like brake cleaner
     
  4. Drail

    Drail Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    5,867
    Brake cleaner is hardly a "mild solvent".......
     
    easy and LRDGCO like this.
  5. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    2,195
    I use it all the time on my shotgun barrels and choke tubes. It dries quickly and helps make removing the buildup a lot easier. Now, don't get it on wood or plastic - that's true; but it won't harm metal. Since the OP wants to remove the finish, it is a viable option.
     
  6. LRDGCO

    LRDGCO Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2018
    Messages:
    349
    I'm not sure what brake cleaner would do to the stock but I'm picturing molten Frosty...
     
  7. Drail

    Drail Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    5,867
    That would depend totally on what kind of finish had been applied to the wood. The thing about brake cleaner is that is was formulated to dissolve deposits on brake parts such as the adhesive binders used to make brake pads that gets heated up and thrown off the rotor. None of that is going to be found in a firearm. Same thing for carb cleaner. There aren't going to be hard dried lacquers from gasoline in your gun like you find in a carburetor or an injector. People use these things because it's what they see on the shelf at the auto parts store and at Walmart. But it's kind of like using sulfuric acid to clean your coffee machine. It's serious overkill and you are exposing yourself to really nasty chemical compounds for no good reason. Use any powder solvent for cleaning. For lubing you have many more options than the ridiculously overpriced "gun lubes"on the market today. I have used nothing but Breakfree CLP for cleaning and Dexron for lube. CLP makes a great lube but Dexron is MUCH cheaper and seems hold up just as good in my experience. A quart of Dexron only cost a few bucks and will last you for many years. I am always completely amazed at some of the things people want to use on their guns. It's people playing with chemicals but with NO knowledge of chemistry. My favorite has to be the guys who wanna know if they can just toss their Glock in a dishwashing machine. Seriously? No. And of course we have the WD 40 kids. It's good for 1000 uses (and none of them are for guns) and I have worked in shops where if they find you bringing in a can of WD 40 you will be really sorry. Another really great gun lube is air tool oil. Cheap and available and won't harm anything.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2019
  8. boom boom
    • Contributing Member

    boom boom Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,685
    Location:
    GA
    Depends, the green formula is mild. The std. stuff is nasty. First see if odorless mineral spirits remove the hydrographics, there is also a very gentle solvent made from soybeans (Soygel) that even removes polyurethane with enough time. The nastier paint strippers like MEK might also damage a plastic stock so use the gentle stuff.
     
    troy fairweather likes this.
  9. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,107
    Location:
    Alabama and Florida
    Acetone, Klean Strip, denatured alcohol.
     
    LRDGCO likes this.
  10. Catcar67

    Catcar67 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    54
    I know this may sound over simplified but I'd research online for these "camo" coatings. When you find what they are, then you will probably find how to clean them off.
     
  11. LRDGCO

    LRDGCO Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2018
    Messages:
    349
    Passed. Somebody, presumably an Eskimo or Norwegian Marine, actually wanted snow camo and was willing to pay a premium. To each his own.
     
  12. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2003
    Messages:
    3,571
    Not an Eskimo, nor a Norwegian Marine, but I have camo'd guns for hunting in the snow. Felt it was more practical to wrap with something removable so when the snow melted you didn't stick out like a neon light.

    [​IMG]
     
    LRDGCO likes this.
  13. armoredman

    armoredman Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    17,214
    Location:
    proud to be in AZ
    What is this "snow"...? Is it the stuff found in a SnoCone? :rofl:
     
  14. LRDGCO

    LRDGCO Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2018
    Messages:
    349
    Nevermind. You're not missing much....

    :)
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice