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Thinking about trying IDPA

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by AFK, Dec 30, 2019.

  1. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Member

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    Timely thread.

    I was at an F Class match with my kids this weekend and my 16 year old son, out of the blue, says he’d like to try a pistol competition.

    I’ll be following the comments
     
  2. waktasz

    waktasz Member

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    uspsa.org

    :)
     
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  3. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    Would you consider having him try point shooting? It will help him shoot fast and accurate regardless of type of competition he ends up shooting.

    Here's basic step-by-step - https://www.thehighroad.org/index.p...-help-me-speed-up.824618/page-4#post-10902245

    Grip I use for point shooting for at home dry fire practice - https://www.thehighroad.org/index.p...r-or-sight-issues.861314/page-2#post-11344669

    Now I have everyone start point shooting with eyes closed natural point of aim at 5 yards after they are proficient with dry fire without moving the front sight. Once they can engage multiple targets at 5 yards with eyes closed (I have seen consistent 2"-3" groups on multiple targets with different shooters), shooting fast and accurate point shooting with eyes open is easier with looking past the front sight for more precise double taps (shooting at two targets that are stacked on top of each other) at greater distances.
     
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  4. waktasz

    waktasz Member

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    Please no. Stop it right now
     
  5. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Member

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    Good advice @LiveLife

    we will work on that
     
  6. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    Don't knock it until you try it.

    When many of us USPSA local shooters hit a plateau and could not improve our stage times and accuracy, some top regional shooters told us we need to approach the "Zen" of shooting and look past the front sight and make holes appear on target, anywhere at will. And took the time to coach us as they were able to take our factory stock pistols and blaze through the stage just as fast to prove it was not our equipment but our shooting approach and technique.

    What they taught us to improve stage times and accuracy was in part, point shooting.

    And the "Zen" of shooting instead of hoping that a hole will appear somewhere on A zone is to be absolutely certain that a hole will appear exactly where you intended the POI to be.
     
  7. waktasz

    waktasz Member

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    Then let them come here and explain it. Some poor kid doesn't need you here filling his mind with second hand nonsense.
     
  8. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    I am not going to argue with you as I have followed your shooting videos as a fan. You are a good match shooter.

    But not all of us are like you.

    And if someone wants to shoot a more practical match like IDPA that require more practical shooting (Our USPSA stage designer also designed/shot IDPA and often had unconventional shooting stages that benefited from point shooting techniques like single weak hand around cover with difficult sight picture), point shooting techniques can come in handy to quickly shoot closer targets.

    So what I would suggest to Nature Boy is for his son to learn all the great match shooting techniques and also practice point shooting and utilize the best applicable shooting technique depending on the stage layout and type of match.

    Peace.

    Nature Boy, feel free to PM me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
  9. waktasz

    waktasz Member

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    Point shooting is a nonsense technique adhered to by basically no one. If you are referring to target focused shooting that's one thing. Every single person at the top of the spot is getting input from their sights for every shot. There may not be a clear front post focus as that is not necessary for all shots at all distances, but to ignore your sights on purpose for certain shots is a guaranteed recipe for disaster.
    Pro tip: it's not any slower to get input from your sights than it is to ignore them. Would you back out of your driveway with your eyes closed just because it's easy to do and you've done it 10,000 times? No, because it's better to look at what you are doing.
     
  10. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    Had you read my posts, you would have realized that while I suggested Nature Boy to start his son off practicing point shooting (Heck even eyes closed to introduce him to natural point of aim to become better familiar with his body), but for actual match shooting, to look past the front sight that regional USPSA shooters taught me to do and do the same thing as what you posted, but expecting/making holes to appear at POA anywhere on target at will, the "Zen" of shooting.

    Yes, for match shooting accuracy, a front sight picture indexed on target is required. But with someone proficient in point shooting, shot can be made faster KNOWING the hole WILL appear on POA and can move onto the next target without waiting to see if the hole appeared at POA.

    I am still fan of your shooting. ;)

    Peace.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
  11. waktasz

    waktasz Member

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    I'd rather you weren't a fan and didn't try to confuse new shooters with nonsense.

    Using the sights has nothing to do with waiting to see if a hole appears on the target either.

    Maybe you should sign your posts with your USPSA number and classification so the new guys can decide if your ramblings are worth even paying attention to
     
  12. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    I am retired due to spinal stenosis and got glaucoma with a touch of cataract so my match shooting days are unfortunately over.

    Nature Boy, disregard what I posted as I am sure waktasz is absolutely correct as learning point shooting basics absolutely has no benefit in match shooting.

    It was interesting that when us local USPSA match shooters plateaued and could not improve our stage times or accuracy, top regional USPSA shooters taught us on the aspects of beyond front sight point shooting to advance/resolve our match shooting issues.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2020
  13. lordpaxman

    lordpaxman Member

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    Lots of great advice here. When I started IDPA, I just ran my carry gun in SSP. It was a P239 .40 IWB, crossbreed holster. The mags were inside my belt, no carrier. At 7+1 and .40 I wasn’t going win the car, but it was a rush for sure. Depending on your goals you may want to consider shooting multiple guns. I found there was humongous difference between slow target practice and fast paced action shooting. If it’s a tier 1 local match the stages probably won’t have many long shots anyway. Grab whatever you have and let them know you’re new, the SO and squad will help you out.

    I’ll second the Blade-tech line, although lots of both appear at matches. Once I was hooked I did decide to compete and that’s fun as well.
     
  14. Milt1

    Milt1 Member

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    As others have said visit IDPA matches and observe the two or three best shooters. Find out what style holsters they use along with the type of pistol. Ask them how they changed their gear over time in order to shoot better or faster. Safety is really stressed in these matches and you wouldn't want it to be otherwise and it does make you feel really safe. In my last IDPA shoot we had to use BUG or backup guns with barrel length no longer than 3 1/2 inches. Being a smaller pistol mine caught on my clothing and was dropped resulting in an immediate disqualification. I didn't mind because I knew the rules and it only makes me want to be a better IDPA contestant because it's a ton of fun.
     
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