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Wrangler's Bearcat

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Geldarr, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. kozak6

    kozak6 Member

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    The HP22 gets a lot of love on the forums, but my buddy's might malfunction on every single round in the magazine in every possible way.

    I'd love to see a Wrangler Bearcat, but I don't think Ruger is going that way. I think the whole point of the Wrangler is to specifically take a bite out of the Rough Rider market.
     
  2. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    True. And it is doing it so well. :D
    Remember that old saying: "If you can't lick em' then join em'."
     
  3. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    I think Grumman would diagree, lol. Wildcat, Hellcat, Bearcat, Tigercat, Tomcat.....
     
  4. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    Wolf Cub.
     
  5. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I owned a bearcat many years ago. It's an excellent little revolver with emphasis on "little'. My hands are medium sized and I found it too small and eventually sold it. I have wanted a bird's head handled single action for awhile now and Ruger only makes one in the bearcat line so no Ruger for me. I gave up and bought a HRR. It's perfect in size. I bet Ruger could sell a bunch if they offered one in the wrangler model and it would be simple to do so. It's just a different grip frame and panels.
     
  6. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    You know, it's funny how comparisons and preferences are often purely subjective.

    I own a New Bearcat and also have medium-sized hands. I found it comfortable to shoot and never found the grip to be too small. It's often been described as a "jewell" of a revolver and I would agree.
    The grip isn't hand-filling like the equally excellent Single Six, but it is well-shaped and as such it really doesn't matter, in my opinion. Both revolvers are very well made and have the same unbreakable coil and torsion spring actions and steel cylinder frames, with the Bearcat being all-steel except for the ejector rod housing.

    The Bearcat has been around since 1958 and around 281,000 original, super, and new
    Bearcats have been made in total, so it must have something going for it.

    But, like I said, it really comes down to subjective preferences.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2019
  7. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I agree. Ruger Single Sixes and Bearcats are top of the line revolvers but like you stated it all in a person's preferences. I've owned a Single Six since shortly after they dropped the flat gate and love it. It's never given me a minute's trouble and I have no idea of the number of it's round count but it's a lot. Load it up and shoot it and if the ammo works like it's supposed to just keep doing that until you decide to quit. The gun will still be going. On the other hand I just can't find any love for the bearcat because of it's size although I have no doubt that one would would be just as dependable as my old Single Six. I really like the looks of the Shop Keeper but there is that size thing. I really don't understand why Ruger doesn't offer that type grip in the Single Six also. I bet they would sell quite a few more than they do of the Shop Keeper.
     
  8. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    I don't know if they would.
    While the New Bearcat is a premium-priced high quality revolver, in the hand it seems to exude Old West charm moreso than the Single Six does.
    With its traditional Old West fixed sights, the shorter barrel, and the Bird's Head grip, it really makes an appealing hide-out gun.
    I'm sure that a Bird's Head grip Single Six would appeal to some such as yourself, but I think that the Single Six primary market is conservative older guys who crave the same traditional Ruger revolvers that they did in their youth.
    On the other hand, how much would it cost to tool up and crank out a new grip frame and replacement grips? Since nothing else needs to be changed, if you offered it on the 4 5/8" barrel blued models for starters, it might sell well enough.
    If the same grip frame was compatible with the Wrangler, those would sell even better.
     
  9. Armybrat

    Armybrat Member

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    Birdsheads are really cool guns, no matter what one’s tastes might be.

    3047139D-6B87-4DE9-ABC3-5CCB1C6ECA8E.jpeg E741F528-6092-468D-858E-281457C7D3F6.jpeg
     
    kBob likes this.
  10. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    Not scripted I think. Just one man's experience with one sample of the gun.
    Reports from owners vary. Some say that they are very reliable. Some have nothing but problems.
     
  11. mcb66

    mcb66 Member

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    Over the years I've had two Bearcats. Never really took to them. Don't have one now. Just felt too much like a toy.
     
  12. Old Stumpy

    Old Stumpy Member

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    For myself, knowing that this revolver is all steel (save for the ejector rod housing) and has really nice rosewood grips, I can't see it as a toy.
    I could not see any other high quality, all-steel, small frame revolver as one either.
    But all opinions are subjective, like I said.
     
    Armybrat likes this.
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