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Ruger Blackhawk

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by MI2600, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    I have a convertible Blackhawk in 38-40/10mm. I purchased it for the 38-40 aspect. But, I was wondering if I couldn't also shoot .40 S&W instead of the 10mm in the other cylinder.

    Anyone see a problem?
     
  2. bluejeans

    bluejeans Member

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    I believe the 10mm will headspace on the case mouth in that cylinder which means that the .40 s&w will sit to deep in the chamber to reliably ignite the primer... if at all.
     
  3. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Good point.
     
  4. Starter52

    Starter52 Member

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    Bluejeans nailed it. Auto pistol cases that headspace on the case mouth are not very interchangeable.
     
  5. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Yes, another brilliant plan with a very slight technical flaw!
     
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  6. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

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    Allow me to go stupid....

    Machine for moon clips, and pull the cylinder to reload...a lot of effort for not much....
     
  7. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    wombat,
    Plan B: Grind off .142" with my bench grinder.
     
  8. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    And then your headspace would be.... wait for it........
     
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  9. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Varminterror,
    Please don't complicate the issue with facts and logic.
     
  10. GarrettJ

    GarrettJ Member

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    I watched those .38-40/10mm convertibles for years. I just couldn’t justify the $1200 and up asking price they always came with.

    But you can now buy a 10mm/.40 BH convertible. And I expect they will be an overpriced collectors item some day too. But they are reasonable now. I find I shoot it more with the 10mm cylinder than with the .40, but it does either equally well.

    You can always ask the Ruger custom shop if they will fit a .40 cylinder to your gun.
     
  11. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Garrett,
    I bought mine used a few years ago mainly for the 38-40, never intending to use the 10mm. The price was right. I have since accumulated some .40SW range brass and I remembered the 10mm cylinder, not thinking the matter through. Your suggestion has merit, but the cost could be prohibitive for a custom cylinder.
     
  12. Heir Kommt Die Sonne

    Heir Kommt Die Sonne Member

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    I imagine 38-40 is a good caliber. I entertained it once myself in a Colt. But if I have to pay over $1000 for one, I'd just stick with the Colt.
    Wish they based the 41 Mag on the 38-40 case instead.
     
  13. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    Easier to buy a take-off 40s&w Blackhawk cylinder and have 3 cylinders
     
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  14. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Varminterror,
    I didn't know Ruger had a 10mm/.40SW convertible. I think I'll contact Ruger to see if they will sell a .40 outright.
     
  15. TTv2

    TTv2 Member

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    It cannot, but Ruger is making cylinders for 10mm/.40 S&W Blackhawks currently, so you may be able to send them the gun and get them to make you a cylinder in .40. It's not gonna be free tho.
     
  16. #1buck

    #1buck Member

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    If ruger won't sell you one buy a .357 cylinder and have a gunsmith bore and chamber it to .40 S&W
     
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  17. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    They won’t. The only time Ruger sells a cylinder for an SA is if that serial number left the factory as a convertible. In the rarest of occasions, some of us have been able to convince them to convert an SA to a chambering which was available as a factory model on that exact configuration, but they have tightened the pursestrings on this in recent years. Typical price when I have bought OEM cylinders from Ruger has been $250ish, plus shipping both ways, so around $325-350.

    Not many smiths will take on revolver work, especially rechambering cylinders, and it can be pricey. When I was set up to do so, I could charge $75 per chamber - putting $450 on a cylinder rebore. This would be on top of $75-100 for the take-off cylinder you found, which is pretty simple in the common calibers.

    Another option would be to purchase a convertible 10/40 Blackhawk, keep the 40 cylinder and sell the rest at a reduced price. In this instance, you would have yet another option of claiming “lost cylinder” and sending it to Ruger for a replacement, at the price I described above, then reselling the whole shebang later as LNIB.

    Alternatively, take-off cylinders typically drop in, and can be purchased from various sources, including eBay, for about $100-150 for the more rare chamberings. You simply need to be patient enough to wait to find one. By far the cheapest route.
     
  18. thomas15

    thomas15 Member

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    Seems like a lot of effort just to use some common range pick-up brass.
     
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  19. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    I have one of the Buckeye models and have concluded that it's just too much gun for the cartridge(s). Would be infinitely better on the mid-frame and I've long threatened to have one built.

    Rechambering a .357 cylinder 'may' be an option but they're also the shortest cylinders Ruger has made so the length may not be compatible. They are not all the same length.


    This would probably be the most economical/practical way to get the desired result.
     
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