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Techniques for Shooting Magnum Revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by HB, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. HB

    HB Member

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    Any tips or pointers out there for shooting magnum revolvers?

    I have been shooting low recoil guns well but accuracy drops off in heavier loadings. I would like to take a deer with my m66 smith this year but with full power reloads my accuracy suffers. With 6.0gr Universal and a 158 SWC I can clean a squirrel’s ear at 20 yards. XTP’s and 15gr H110 I am hitting a paper plate at 25.

    It seems a death grip makes things more consistent yet when a doe slips in at 10 yards, will I rememeber to grip tightly?


    Thanks
     
  2. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    Couple things come to mind....

    What kind of grips are you running? K-frame magnagrips simply don't offer a whole lot of control for heavy magnums. For hunting applications, I like rubber Hogues as they have generous finger grooves. S&W Target grips are OK too, especially if you have bigger hands, but can be slippery.

    If you think jitters/nerves are your issue, try a calming mantra. I like to use the ones from Steven Kings' "The Gunslinger" (I do not shoot with my hand...) or Frank Herbert's "Dune" (I shall not fear....), though you can find many more on the internet. The conscious part of the brain focuses on the words, allowing your autonomous systems to take over functions like aiming and grip.

    Finally, practice, practice, practice. Once again, you want the mechanics of aim, grip, and trigger control to become instinctual, so that the only thing you are thinking about before firing is shot placement, range/drop, and how yummy that venison is going to be! This is especially important with handgun hunting as it is so much more challenging than long gun.

    Good luck bro, if you take any critters post some pics!
     
  3. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    hold on tight!
     
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  4. JONWILL

    JONWILL Member

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    Practice with a few empty shells on the chamber

    Stick them in randomly with your eyes closed or have someone else do it for you The load the magnum rounds

    You probably have a flinch. You will find out when you are expecting a boom and get a click.
     
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  5. Dhom

    Dhom Member

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    Why not just use the 6 gr load? Bullet placement goes a long way! Your load should be good to 50 yds.
     
  6. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Chase the flinch! I use the 'surprise click' method @JONWILL mentioned; it reveals your flinch, and then you can solve it.
     
  7. Barry loyd

    Barry loyd Member

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    For me a “death grip” makes things worse. Weak hand thumb locked over strong hand thumb with a firm but not white knuckle grip is what works for me. Remember only the first shot has to be on target and you can only shoot one round at a time.
     
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  8. Bo

    Bo Member

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    Get yourself a set of grips (Hogue) that place your middle finger lower than the trigger guard. This will stop the "knuckle busting" and you'll feel much more comfortable shooting magnum loads.
     
  9. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    As others have stated a grip that fits you really makes a big difference. I don't believe a rubber grip is necessary though. Wood or synthetics that fit YOUR hand well make shooting magnum revolvers comfortable. If your hand isn't beat up you will flinch less. Some folks confuse the bandaid that is a rubber grip with a good fit. In a long range session a lack of hand battery with the presence of blisters is a good indicator cushioning is being used to compensate for poor hand fitment. A grip that really fits you well also provides proper trigger reach, enhancing your trigger squeeze and control.

    Do not lock your elbows. and wrists. That will beat you up fast. If you are hunting and not speed shooting there is no need to try and drive the gun that way. Your arms and shoulders should be part of the recoil system. Let it role, but don't keep your wrists too loose or muzzle rise can get obnoxious.

    Keep a firm grip with your strong hand and a bit firmer grip with your support hand.
     
  10. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    I grip them all the same, whether it's a .22 or a .500. I just focus a little more when it can hurt me. ;)

    A firm grip but not a death grip. Like you would shake a man's hand. Arms should be somewhat relaxed. Recoil should be absorbed through the elbows and shoulders. Some shooters lock their elbows but allow their wrists to break and the sixgun rotates violently towards the face. That ain't the way to do it.

    Grips are a huge component and it's near impossible to shoot accurately if they don't fit your hand comfortably. Contrary to popular misconception, the shape is far more important than the material used. It might seem counter-intuitive to some but the micarta on this model 15 is infinitely more comfortable than any rubber grip.

    IMG_6658b.jpg
     
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  11. cheygriz

    cheygriz Member

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    Get GOOD earplugs and GOOD muffs to go over them. "Blast" causes more flinch than recoil.
     
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  12. MidRoad

    MidRoad Member

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    She purdy Craig!
     
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  13. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    Good firm grip. They're going to buck, bark and spark when you shoot the magnum. The fun part is taming that stallion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
  14. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    You will if that's how you fired your last 3,000 rounds in practice.
     
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  15. I6turbo

    I6turbo Member

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    I've noticed that you have various smooth wood grips on a lot of your revolvers. What are the brands/models that you have found to be good for the Smith K and L frames? I have a 586 that I'd like to outfit with a set similar to some of yours to see how they work for me. Any suggestions? Thanks.
     
  16. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    I like Herrett's grips -- Among other things, they can provide grips for out-of-production revolvers, like my Colt New Service.
     
  17. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    Those pictured above are from Culina. Although I had him make them a wee bit thinner than usual. Around 1.2" at the screw. Herrett's is also very good and perhaps the best value in a true custom grip.
     
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  18. Mosin Bubba

    Mosin Bubba Member

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    If you're shooting the 38s fine, I'd guess it's a flinch.

    One thing a shooting buddy of mine did when he saw I was flinching with 357s was to take the revolver and load it with a random mix of 357s and 38s, spin the cylinder, then hand it to me. It REALLY makes you notice when you're jerking the crap out of the gun and all that comes out is a 38 puff. Empty cylinders in a higher caliber would serve the same purpose, although I like the 357/38 game because I found that I took my aiming and accuracy more seriously if I knew there was a bullet coming out.
     
  19. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    Two big possibilities: 1) You're flinching. That's the lead contender. 2) You're not actually flinching, but you are so intent on hanging onto the gun with your right/strong/trigger hand that you are finding it impossible to isolate the trigger finger motion - instead, you are grabbing with your whole hand, which shoves the gun around.

    How do we know which one it (primarily) is? Easy: ARE YOU SEEING THE SIGHTS DIP OR DODGE AROUND JUST BEFORE THE GUN GOES OFF? If you are not seeing the sights move in a way that corresponds to the hits you're getting, the you are blinking just before the gun goes off... and a blink = flinch. Your goal will need to be to raise your threshold of recoil/blast tolerance high enough not to close your eyes during the shot. If, on the other hand, you are seeing the sights moving around just before the gun goes off, then you just have a technique/mechanical problem that should be pretty addressable in dry-fire if you make sure to grip the gun just as hard as you would in live-fire.

    If it's the flinch problem, I have a lot of suggestions... you can trust me, because I'm a flincher from way back! But I don't want to go into a long flinch-busting post if you don't have a flinch to cure.
     
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  20. HB

    HB Member

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    I am using hogue rubber grips. Magnas hurt and I dont find the target grips very comfortable.

    I would agree that its primarily a flinching issue. I will continue to dry fire at home and at the range. My DA and SA shooting are nearly identical groupings.

    Is a lead SWC at 1100-1200 fps enough juice for a deer?
     
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  21. HB

    HB Member

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    Also, thanks for the replies.

    HB
     
  22. Barry loyd

    Barry loyd Member

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    Yes it is. Within appropriate range. The LSWC has put a lot of meat on tables and a lot of people on a slab.
     
  23. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    Have you ever shot a Ruger Blackhawk or Super Blackhawk?

    Plow-handled single-action revolvers direct the recoil differently. For me it makes the recoil seem lighter.
     
  24. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    The first time I fired my Security Six with the stock wooden grips it stood straight up pointing skyward. That taught me that a firm grip was necessary. On the next outing I had fitted it with Pachmayr Presentation grips. That and accepting the fact that there was substantial recoil worked for me. Kind of like firing a powerful rifle for the first few times...you adjust to the kick.
     
  25. HB

    HB Member

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    I have a blackhawk as well but it is a huge handgun for a 357. 4” 66 is packable with a slung rifle plus Id like to kill a deer with my main handgun.

    I’ll stick to my lead reloads for practice and hunting. Seems like accuracy is more important than power in this case.
     
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